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9 -445807 


.'■ '. Where 'cailibie'iisd 


SANDWICHES OF AIX KINDS, SOtUPS, TEA, COFFEE. AND REGUI^^;^DMRy" 

Our mena cousin of a careful aelectibu of . the most ati|ieti|ing and : 
the market a£^ordB. In every case everything Is of the choicest quaUt^^ [cooked ana ^ 
- served as feiod .of. this sort riiould be cooked . and served. Our unique ‘combination 
breakfast plan is proving a most popular feature. . ..... . . . . . 


$5.50 Cbeck for $5.00. 


Pure Milk and Cream. 

NE:L.S 0 N 1^. MA.R.T 1 N. 


All Kinds of Meats, 



THE HENRY H. TUTTLE GO., - • Washington and Winter; Streets, Boston. 


GEC^a.SE H, LANE, 



You will find oh our counters a large and 
carefully selected stock of Fine American 
and Foreign Woolens at moderate prices. 

PRINCE ALBERT 
and DR^ SUITS 


OUR SPECIALTY 


We |re closing, put pur ^ds ahd.:enps 
in HosiJ5RY,-UND«h1<r^ and 

SwhA^SRireg^rdless]6f^^^^ ' " ' ■ 

Odd sizes , in Mbn.’s iFaitcx SjaiR^S, one 
half regfiriaf priced ' Y ■ / _ 

We give ‘ special attrition to Stud^ts’ 
lauttd^. Wpric c^hl^d for and; delivered 
promptly.' ■ Yp. C . ' 

A. COflEN, 329 


IS BoylstonSt.^ 651 Wa^hi 
Boston. ' . ■ . ' . 





tii 


Royal 0airy J^unch 

U and 12 PARK SQUARE 
BOSTON ^ ^ MASS. 

Open Day and Night 




A. C STONE, ) 

f Propfietofs 
C H. MANSFIELD, j 


Browning, King&Co, 

700 Washington Street, BOSTON. 




CUSTOM DEPARTMENT 

Is now prepared to sliow the 
latest novelties for all garments. 


Overcoats to order, 
Suits to order, - 
Trousers to order, 


$20 to $55 
$20 to |40 
$6 to $12 


Fit and Wear Guaranteed. 




MATTHEW KING, ^ Manager, 


The Berkeley Hotel 

B«rlEel«y and Bosrlston Streets 

EUROPE^AN AND 

yff W AMERICAN PLANS 

Modem in Every Detail 
9 9 

l^esta.UX*an t a la Carte 

Dinini^ room table <i* Kote 

Oentlesnen's CAP£ and Billiard 
Room. £ntraaoe on BerKeley 'St. 

9 9 

JOHN A, SHERLOCK 


C. F. HOVEY & CO.i 

J 

Importers and Retailers of 

Dry Goods, 


FINE CUSTOM MADE 
SHIRTS A SPEQALTY. 


PARIS, 

12 Ambroise 
T homos. 


BOSTON. 

33 Summer St. 

and 

42 Al>on St. 


In writing adverlisers kindly mention Tits'' TBCH, 








XM 


»y 


Everything 

SUITABLE FOR YOUNG MEN 


Smokins^ Jackets, Gloves, Umbrellas, 
Ties, Furnishing: Goods of all kinds. 

Special Line of Dress Suit Cases 

$ 2.50 $ 4.00 $ 5.00 $ 6.00 $ 7.00 

We take orders in our Military Dept, 
for College and Society Emblems, made 
with either screw back, button or pin 
fastening, hard enameled, in correct 
colors for the society which the emblem 
represents. 


OAK HALL 

Washington and Elm Streets, 


SCIENTIFIC BOOKS 

^ DAnRELL & UPHAn, 

The Old Corner Bookstore 

283 Washington St., Boston, 


ALL GOODS REQUIRED BY 
STUDENTS AT 

fllbaclacblan’ 6 , 

214 Clarenbon Street 

Drawing Instruments and Materials, etc. 
Fountain Pens, Text Books. 


Fall In! 

Keep Step with Progress 
in the Art of Photography 

All the Latest High Art 

Productions can he hod of 



21 West St. - - Boston,, Mass. 


Pocket lllaanifying glasses 



$itt I). Con$». D!4m. <m(l i inch. 

Price 40c. each. 

We are prepared to quote lowest 
prices on all forms of Magnif)ing 
Glasses, Coddingtons, Aplanatic 
Triplets, etc. Cameras and Photo- . 
graphic Supplies. 

Pinkham Sz SImilih 

Opticians, 

!2SS Boylsion 
Besion, Hass. 


In writing adverti.ers kindly uieution THE TECH. 







TM 


Locomotive and Car Wheel lires^ 

Forgings and Castings, 

Bar Steel, 


Nickel Steel 
Forgings 
for 

Marine Engines. 



Ordnance 

Forgings 

and 

Castings. 






OFFICE AND WORKS: 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


In writing advenlsers kindly mention THIS TKCH. 






THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF FOREIGN WOOLLENS SHOWN IN BOSTON. 


CO-OPERATIVE. 




In writing advertisers kindly mentiou THE TECH 






VOL. XXI. 


BOSTON, February i 3 , 1902. 


NO. 15 . 


The Tech 


Published every Thursday, duringr the colleg-e year, by students 
oi the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 


RICHARD C, TOLMAN, 1903 Editor-iu-Chirf. 

G. ij. ATKINS, 1904, Assistant Editor-in-Chitf. 

H. W. GODDARD, 1904, Hecrfiary, 

C. H. GKA^SSEK, 1905, Alumni Editor. 
C. A. SAWYER, jR., 190*. 

1 . RAVNR ADAMS, 1901. 

W. J. WELLMAN, 1902, j Editors 
H. A. SCHHRRER. S903. > ^ 


PRESTON M. SMITH, 1904. Easiness Manaser. 

c! w.To'^HN^r Jn,' IT 4 ' i 


Oppich : 30 Rogers, 491 Boylston Street. 

OPPTCE HOURS : 

Etlitor-in-Cliief, Monday, 11-12.30 p.m. 

Business Manager, Thursday, 12-1 P.M. 


J’ot the benejit (jfJ simlents THU TliCH wilt be pleased to answer 
all (jne-itions and oblaiu all possible information pertaining to any 
deparltneul of the College,. 

CofUribnlions are requested from all undergraduates., alumni^and 
officers of instruction. No anon ymous manuscript can be accepted. 

AH communications with the Alumni Department should be ad^ 
dressed to the Alumni Editor. 


Subscription, I2.00 peryear, in advance. Single copies, locts. 
filtered iii Fo.st>of 1 ice, Bostoii» Mass., as Second-class Matter. 


Puritan Press, Boston. 



i 


NCE again the student body 
has returned from a gen- 
erous vacation to take up 
renewed strength and 
vigor the work of the sec- 
ond term. The Senior 
has dropped out of social affairs to make 
sure the last lap, with the goal in sight. On 
the other hand, the Freshman first begins to 
appreciate what Technology life and work 
means, and seriously begins to suspect that 
only straightfprvvard, conscientious work will 
bring him through without the trouble of 
summer schools and condition exams. 
The Tech wishes success and a hearty wel- 
come to all. 


HE showing of the 
^ g Technology men 

M at the recent B. 
A. A. Indoor Ath- 
letic Meet was 
very encouraging. 

II The winning of 
relay race 

r^ rtP with Bowdotn, and 

the capturing of 
quite a number of heats in the other events, 
leads us to believe that our track team would 
not make such a poor showing in competition 
with another college. A track team seems 
to be the only athletic team that has e%’er 
had much success at the Institute. This is 
mainly due to the fact that individual work 
counts for the most in this branch of sport. 
The team woi'k, which is so necessary for 
baseball and football, and which is so diffi- 
cult to acquire with short hours of practice, 
plays but little part in track athletics. Let 
us give the track team our hearty support, in 
the hope that arrangements will be made and 
carried out for a dual meet with one or two 
of the smaller colleges. 


T a recent meeting of the 
Congregationalist ministers 
held in Pilgrim Hall, Presi- 
dent Pritchett read a paper 
on “The Student Problem 
in the Great Cities.” Within the last ''few 
weeks there have been so many more or less 
excited discussions of student gatherings, 
that, in the heat of argument, we have some- 






128 THE ■ 

— 

times forgotten that the nature of refresh- 
ments served at a recent student gath- 
ering is not really the most important of stu- 
dent problems. Hence the broad-minded 
way in which Dr. Pritchett treated the sub- 
ject, refusing to use the opportunity for petty 
recrimination, is all the mnieniotitreniji errand " 
gratifying. Our president was able to look 
beyond newspaper misrepresentations, and to 
see the problems of student life unconfused 
by the heat of recent arguments. 

Dr. Pritchett’s perfect good humor and 
frankness won the complete respect of his 
audience, many of whom necessarily differed 
with him in opinions. At the close of his 
paper he expressed his willingness to answer 
questions which the members might put to 
him. With his permission we print below 
one of his answers, which treats the immedi- 
ate though perhaps less important question 
of student kommers : 

So far as I know, no man has proposed to introduce 
the Gerraaa kommers into the United States. No 
man who knows both countries would attempt it. By 
what perversion of facts it has been made to appear 
that such an attempt has been made at the Institute 
I do not know. I am getting numerous letters pro- 
testing against something which has never been done. 

The question which has arisen is a very different 
One. It is this : Shall students be permitted to hold 
gatherings in a building controlled by the Institute, 
at'which a modest amount of beer is used, and where 
instructors are present, as a substitute for ex])ensive 
down- town dinners, where no restraint is present? 

For' the attitude which has been taken in this mat- 
ter the Institute and its trustees have no :responsi- 
bility. It has been a personal action for which I am 
alone responsible. My position toward the drink 
question is this : 

The drinking of beer is not a wicked, nor even an 
immoral thing. The question whether one uses it or. 
not is one for each man to decide. I do not know 
why Christ used wine at his gatherings of disciples. 
Fordoing so he received the severe criticism of , the 
church members of his own day. There were tein- 
perance societies in his day, but he never joined them, 
and while he -always condemned drunkenness he 
never condemned the social use of wine, - - - 

Personally,! believe that tem.perance is^seryed by 
teaching men self-control and rational habitSi - l am ' 


TEOM 


the last man to advise any man to use wine, but as 
between a meeling of students down-town and with- 
out the association of older men, and a meeting in a 
building under our contr61,'where those who wish it 
are i)emiilted beer in a temperate fashion, I am cer- 
tainly in favor of the last. 1 believe this- attitude to 
be ope .which looks toward the moral upbuilding of 
young men. Personally 1 am glad to meet Institute 
students at a social gathering whether they have beer 
or whether they have not. 


The Tech Show. 

With a trio of successes, behind it, each one 
a little better than its predecessor, “ The Tech 
Show” is again to be heard from, and is to 
make its fourth annual attempt to please the 
Boston public, and Tech men in particular. 
“ Applied Mechanics ” is the name of the 
play that is to be presented, — something 
thoroughly local from its name down, and a 
play abounding in clever situations and hits of 
such a delightful nature that they cannot help 
but strike a sympathetic chord in the heart 
of every Tech student. 

There will be even more than the usual 
number of up-to-date topical songs, many of 
them written especially for the play by well- 
known composers. Tuneful choruses, too, 
and startling and picturesque ballets will add 
their share towards the success of the per- 
formance. In a few da3's a call will be 
issued for candidates for the sliow, and it is 
hoped that students will come out from all the 
classes to lielp towards making this annual 
event in Tech theatricals as great a success 
as it has been in the past. ‘ 

The show is under the general management 
of ■ Lawrence H. Underwood, ’03. Matt 
Brodie, ’02, is business manager, and Robert 
White, -Jr. j ’01, is press manager. Two per- 
formances will he given at liie Hollis Street 
Theatre, a dress rehearsal and a regular per- 
formance, oh Tuesday and Friday afternoons 
respectively. ■ These ■ will be given during 
t Jiuvibr. Weekv the -latteV part of April, some- 
j what earlier than last year’s show; • 



XME -TEOM 


J29 


The Annual B. A. A. Handicap Games; 

The annual handicap games of the Boston 
Athletic Association were held on Saturday, 
Feb. 8. Tech entered fourteen men and 
placed thirteen in final heats, capturing in all 
seven medals. J. W. Crowell and W. A. 
Clark took second and third places in the 
finals of the novice 40-yard dash; and in the 
40-yard handicap heats were won by Clark, 
Winchester and Crowell. R. P. Nichols 
took third place in the 600-yard riin. The 
relay race was practically won in the first 
relay by Avery. Nutter of Bowdoin 
made a game struggle in the last relay, but 
Captain Baker was able to keep the lead with 
easy running. Tech had a scratch man 
entered in the 1,000-yard and a lo-yard man 
in the 600, but w'as unable to run them as 
they were to take part in the relay race. 
This seems very unfortunate, as these men 
would undoubtedly have won other places,. 

Every credit for this good showing should 
be given to Coach Mahan, whose work made 
the result possible. It is hoped that Mr. 
Mahan will be with the track team through 
the months of March, April and Ma3^ 

On Friday, Feb. 14, at 1.15 p m., a mass 
meeting will be held in Huntington Hall in the 
interests of track athletics. Dr. Pritchett will 
speak, and it is hoped that .every one will ,be 
present. 

Aptness of the Filipinos. 

President Pritchett of the Institute of Tech- 
nology, who was formerlj' superintendent of 
the United States Coast Survey, has an 
active interest in the outcome of the experi- 
ment which the United States is making in 
the Philippines and elsewhere. As superin- 
tendent of the Coast Survey he undertook 
the experiment of having some of the native 
Filipinos instructed in draughting and survey- 
ing, to see whether they could be taught to 
do creditable work: ■ The* following extract 


frorh a letter just received from one of 'the 
draugirtsmen in the Philippines would seem to 
indicate That the natives are capable of learn- 
ing the medbanical part of the work of draught- 
ing and surveying. 

“You doubtless remember that you in- 
structed me to go to Manila and train some 
native draughtsmen to draw charts, and then 
devise some method of publishing them 
promptly. I thought that you might be 
pleased to see to what extent your instruc- 
tions have been complied with, so I am send- 
ing you b}^; this mail, under separate cover, 
the first two charts we published, , and the 
last two. The entire work of ' the latter was 
done by the Filipinos, and we succeeded iii 
publishing a chart in just one week after the 
data was received.” 


Book Review. 

So7ig's of the Eastern Colleges : Hinds & 
JVobhc, I go I. 

We wish to acknowledge the receipt, of a 
copy of “Songs of the Eastern Colleges.” 
The book, which is compiled bj'^ R. A. At- 
kinson of Harvard and Ernest Carter of 
Princeton, includes a collection of not only 
all of the typical songs, but also of the most 
popular songs belonging specially to the dif- 
ferent Eastern colleges. The preface con- 
tains the following; “All the world loves 
the college student, and under no circum- 
stances is he more amiable or more provoca- 
tive of contagious geniality than when he 
.sings his college songs.” Technology is 
represented by but one song, and this has but 
little me; it.; This, however, is no fault of 
the compilers, as no real representative 
Technology song has ever been written. 
The book is got up quite attractiyel^', and 
would add to any college man’s room. The 
publishers’ advertisement can he found oh 
another page of this issue. 


U Mr. Dooley on “Co-eds.” 

BY OI^EOMARGARtNE W, GLUCOSE. 

(With a thousand apologies to Mr. P, F. Dutme and our*‘Co^ds.^*) 

“They till, me that they do be havin' Co— ids. 
down at Tich, Hinnissy,” said Mr. Dooley. 

“If it’s dangerous,”, said Mr. Hennessy* “why 
don’t the stoodints get vaccinated before itshpreads? ’’ 

“ Ye’re ignure-ant, Hinnissy, but ye cut Ar-rlo 
Bates’s lictiires ah’ so it ain’t ye-er fault. I will now 
throw upon th’ screen a dihnitionof a Co-id., an’ niver 
lit me ketch ye agin with that ignure-ant lukk on 
ye-er face. As I was sayin’ befure ye inlheru'ppted 
me, a Co-id. is a feymel stoodint at a male shkool,” 

“A correspondince shkool, ye mane? ” asked Mr. 
.'Hennessy. 

“I mane,” said Mr. Dooley, slightly irritated, “an 
institoochian at which th’ overwhilmln’ majoority iv 
th’ stoodints is min, an’ not, as might be supposed, 
wimmin. For wanst, Hinnissy, th’- wimmin is in th’ 
minoority — th’ shmall but silict minoority. ‘ Fr’m 
time immemorial,’ as th’ oryathurs says, ‘ wommin, 
gloryus wommin, has rocked th’ craydle and rocking 
th’ craydle has ruled th’ wur-rld.’ Yis, Hinnissy, ’tis 
manny a thing we o\ye to wommin. Just at prisint, 
I owe Mis’ Grogan f’r me lasht week’s wash. But 
all jokin’ aside, Hinnissy, wimmin is a good thing. 
T’be shure, ’twas Eve who ate th’ apple, but so have 
you an* I, Hinnissy, manny a time. Thrue, Shake- 
speare, Miltin, an’ ahl thim other gr-reat potes was 
not wimmin, but I feel ahlmost shure the-er mothers 
were. Good wimmin is in manny rayspicts like good 
Seegar-rs, Hinnissy, ye don’t know why ye love thim, 
but ye do, do, do. Thin agin, some wimmin is like 
some taychers whin they cahls on ye to raycite — they 
keep ye guissin’. But they is wan rayspict in which 
ahl wimmin is alike, an’ that is, they is ahl diff’rent. 
‘ Wommin,’ says Prof. Mortimer Dpodlepip, iv the 
Ooniversity iv Sqiiedunk Lower Falls, ‘ is mintally th’ 
inferiore iv man.’ ‘ How d’ye know?’ asks the Gin- 
ral Public. ‘ I feel it in me bones,’ says Dr. Doodle- 
pip. But th’ real reason is because his little Maggie 
has wint back on him. She has - rayfused to 
write her name in hisautobeeograph ahlbura, Hinnissy. 
j* Chimical,' as will as mismiric analaysiz,’ says Dr. 
Doodlepip, ‘ shows that woramin’s brain is much 
;shraaller:in. por-portion to its size thin a man’s brain 
jiv likfiiCfQss-siClion,’ 

“ ‘ Maggie,’ thinks I, * ye may have a shmall' brain, 


but it has done _a, big i/img. It has done Dr, Doodle- 
pip.’” 

“But d’ye think gir-rls is th’ ayquil iv man?” 
asked Mr.'Henriessy. 

“ They ar-'re not the ayquil iv man, Hinnissy, they 
ar-re th’ ayquivalint ixprissed in ter-rms iv pie an’ the 
unknown quantity. To solve this ayquation, Hinnissy, 
add ye'ersilf and a box iv chukelits, subtract iv’ry- 
body ilse, separate into facthers, coilict like ter-rms, 
inclose in parenthesiz, and solve f’r th’ answer.” 

“An* is the answer in th’ book?” asked Mr. 
Hennessy. 

“The answer is not in th’ book,” answered Mr. 
Dooley, “ an’ f’r because it gives a diff’rent raysult 
iv’ry time. Look into her eyes, Hinnissy, f’r th’ 
answer. But I have been shpakin’ a long while about 
gir-rls, an’ I will now till ye iv th’ Co-ids. They’se 
nearly thirteen hundhred stoodints at Tich, an’ 
about four per cint iv thim ar-re cabled Co-ids. 
f’r because they wear pitticoats. ’Tis monsthrous to 
cahl thim names on account iv their driss. ’Tis mon- 
sthrous, I say. I’ve heerd till that they is as ginitle- 
manly as anny wan there.” 

“An* f’r why do they go there?” asked Mr. 
Hennessy. 

“They could not go to VVillesley, Hinnissy, f’r 
because Willesley is not co-iducalional — it is a gir-rls’ 
shkool, — or, if they could, probably they're too 
fahstidjus. Probably they don’t think gir-rls is good 
enough. Thin some iv thim likes lahng shtips an’ 
nothoriety too will. They w’d like Tich, Tich, Tich, 
writ ahl over their faces in red an’ gray,” 

“Ain’t ye puttin’ it a bit shtrahng?” asked Mr. 
Hennessy. 

“ I thry to be a gintleman, Hinnissy, an’ to shpeak 
th’ truth, but if I wint to VVillesley to shkool, I’d 
ixpict to face th’ music. Lit the Co-ids. do the same at 
Tich. If they c’n take shopwor-tk, they c’n take this. 
Lit thim be chimists, an’ architicts if they wants, but 
be hivens, thin, they musht lit their husbands shtay at 
home an’ shpind th’ money. Iv’rything in its proper 
place, Hinnissy, an eye f’r an eye, a tooth f’r a 
tooth, a man f’r an architict an’ a wommin f’r a man. 
Think of reading sich a notice in th’ paper-rs, Hinnissy, 

‘ Mrs. Mariar Smithkins, th’ will-known invintress an’ 
ingineeress, has gone to Washington to accipt a 
position in th’ Pathent Office. She is accompaneed 
by her' dog an* her husband. Mr. Smithkips was 
consithered the most beautiful man in Oklahoma.’ 

“ Ingineers, chimists, architicts an’ thim like is ahl 
right, Hipnissy, they’s ahl r-right, but they’s wan thing 
I like betther.” 

“An* what’s that?” asked Mr. Hennessy. 

“ Gir-rls,” said Mr. Dooley. 



I 




TWE 


TEOf-f 


* J3t 



The next concert of the Musical Clubs will 
be held Feb. 19, at Medfield. 



All comniunlcatiotis with this department should be ad- 
dressed t« the Alumni Editor. 


’96. William L, Root, X., has recently 
aken charge of the Physics Department, 
Newark High School, Newark, N. J. 


E. Gordon Thatcher, a special 1902 sttir 
dent, is now an assistant in the Freshman 
-laboratory. 

Tickets for the 1904 Class Pipes and Canes 
may be had from the committee, Nosberry, 
Metcalfe, Willard. 

There will be an important meeting- of the 
class of ’05^ in Room xi, Rogers Hldg,, at 
11.30, oh Saturday, Feb. 15th., Beside the ■ 
election of representatives to the Institute 
Committee, other business will be considered. 

The hockey team has had hard luck in secur- 
ing games. On more than one instance the ' 
opposing team has failed to make an appearance. 
The following games, however, have been 
played: Brookline, o, Tech, i; PhilHps- 
Andover, 2, Tech, 2. 

Governor Crane has appointed as com- 
missioners to determine and report on the 
feasibility and advisability of constructing 
a dam across the Charles River between 
Cambridge and Boston the following : Dr. 
Henry S. Pritchett, Col. S. M. Mansfield of 
the United States Engineer Corps, and Mr. 
Richard Dana. 

Prof. William Z. Ripley, Ph,D., Associate 
Professor of Sociology and Economics, has 
accepted a professorship of economics at 
Harvard, where he has been lecturing during 
the past year. Dr. Ripley will complete this 
year at the Institute, as he is not to assume 
his. new duties until Sept, j, X902. 


’99, Albert F. Nathan, X., is an examiner 
in the Patent Office at Washington, D. C. 

’00. George O. Adams, V., is with the 
Stale Board of Health at the Experiment 
Station, Lawrence, Mass. 

’00. Elbert G. Allen, II., is with Stone & 
Webster, electrical experts and engineers, 
Boston. 

’00. Harrison E. Ashley, X., is chemist 
with the Tremont Nail .Co. at New Bedford, 
Mass. 

’00. Stephen Bodlam, III., is assistant 
superintendent of the Merchant Mill De- 
partment of the Pennsylvania Steel Co. at 
Steelton, Penn. 

’00. James E, Barker, VI., is with the 
Minneapolis General Electric Co. at Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

’01. W. G. Kelley, VI., is with the Gen- 
eral Electric Co. of Chicago. 

’01. Charles L. B. Anderson is occupied 
in sewer construction in Newburyport, Mass. 

’01. William C. Arsem is a research 
chemist in Schenectady, N. Y. 

’01. Charles I. Aner is a mining engineer 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

’01. Francis K. Baxter is assistant super- 
intendent of the Wilkes Mining Co. at 
Graneville, Ga. 



’oi. L. Herbert Bigelow is assistant, engi- 
neer of the Merrimac Paving Go.,, ..Lowell, 
Mass. 

’oi. E. G. Allen is with Stone & Webster, 
Boston, Mass. 

’oi. Frank H. Bass is teaching in the 
Univei'sity of Minnesota, Minneapolis. • 

’oi. W. G. Biauvelt is with the AmerL 
can Bell Telephone Company, Boston. 

*oi. L. DuPont is draughtsman for the 

Pencoyd Iron Works, Pencoyd, Pa. 

’oi. G. F. Fisk is engiriper for'lhe'New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
South Terminal Station, Boston. ' . c' 

’oi. L. S. Florsheim is rodman on the re-^- 
construction of the Chicago & Alton Raih 
road. , . , , 

’oi. M. B. Foster was married to Miss ; 
Isabell Janette Price of New York, the 5lh of ■ 
December, 1901. .... 

’01. M. W. D.oyle is .in the construdtion | 
department of the Eastman Kodak Conjpany, i 
Rochester,, N..Y. . , ' 

’01. C. E. Martin is with the Smead Iron 
Works, Jersey City, N. J. 

'oi. Howard T. Chandler, 11 ,, has been ; 
in the employ of S.tone & Webster since Oc- 
tober. At present he is in Sydney, Cape 
Breton, where he is doing draughting work 
in connection with the installation o^ a street 
railway. 

•Institute- men will regr<d: to learn of. the: 
death of Edward North, 2d,, of the Clak of 
1900. He died after a ve,ry short. illness,, of 
pneumonia, at Qijray , Colorado. Feb. 8, ;i903. 

We report with regret the death of Mr. 
Sumner M. Milliken on the afternoon of 
Sunday, Jan. 19. Ml'. .Milliken was, a : 
graduiue of Course I., .‘.’97,. and was m the | 
employ of the. Boston & Maine, Raifvyay. J. p 



Miss Adams is such a winning actress that surely, 
when she finds just /A^play, she' tvill' be altogether de- 
lightful ; but I cannot persuade myself that “ Quality 
Street ” is the. play. . 

In Mr. Barrie’s dramatic composition much of the 
charm of' his hovels' survives j but his perception is 
so delicate, bis effect so refined and subdued, that in 
dramatic action they can hardly be represented with- 
out exaggeration^^ “ Quality Street ” is a comedy of 
quaint, quiet English life at the time of the Napole- 
onic wars,— enlivened by much fun in the dialogue 
and a pervasive humor in the characters and situa- 
tions,-^ a play with an infinite deal of the unobtrusive 
; pathos of simple, commonplace facti As long as the 
play keeps to presentation qf this life, during the 
: acts in which, so. to speak, this pretty background is 
i woven, the pattern, is lovely, thc rpicture very simple 
j and real. But when, with the later acts, action and 
' exciteni^nt become necessary, the texture of the 
whole seems to fray out, the figures become distorted 
■inld caricature, and the piece ravels out in confusion. 
We begin to forget Phoebe’s charm and to question, 

, -Do such, quiet livfes go through such frantic crises? 

Could this all actually occur? The Phoebe of the 
■ first act, the Phcebe of that magnificent, passionate 
, protest at the loss of her, girlhood, completely, w.ins 
our belief and sympathy; but Phcebe with peas in 
her shoes seems fantastic and foolish. Pleasurable 
as the play unquestionably is, it does not quite satisfy. 
■The earlier half promised greater scenes, and Miss 
Adams certainly- can. handle greater scenes than the 
piece ever provides. 

¥ ¥ ^ ■ 

■Mr. Frbhrnan promised us from Miss Adams' one 
performance of “ As Yqu Like It,” but the presenta- 
tion, is,’ I, believe, indefinitely postponed. Surely our 
anticipation- was keen enough -without any delay. , ■ 

■gjdj t,; : ■ 'y ¥ ■ ¥.'1 .'¥. - ■- ■ 

Wfeek, of course,’' is the high tide of the 
dramatic yeaA Miss -Terry and Sir H^rffy Irving 


m 


— — „ ^ — j — ji, . l. ■ . .. , J ■ ^ ,.l .J■ ll LL ' ■ ■ I » ■ — r 


are bountiful to us this $e4?on, offering for the firgt 
week four different plays, — ^“Charles I,” a revival of 
an earlier success; ^‘ Madame Sans Gehej” with Sir 
Henfy as Napoleon Louis XI ” } and “The. Mer- 
chant of ' Venice.” Irving is perhaps’ ney'ef - tetter 
than in his fearful .Louis XL; but the .play of . all best 
worth seeing, is, I believe, the !‘.‘ M«rchant^V— not 
only because it is Shakespeare, but because in that 
play both of the great artists appear at their best. 

Scientific N^tes, 

' The concrete lock in the Mississippi, River 
near St. Paul is' noted for, its construct'jqh, 
especially in three- respects : -for the, use of 
silica-cement ground for the site, tor the con- 
struction of side walls in the form of rows of 
abutting, wtdge-shaped blopks, and for ; a 
concrete-mixing plant - largely driven by a 
compressed air engine and arranged so that 
the materials fall from., one machine to 
another by gravity. 

Color in water, though not necessarily ah 
indication of any harmful propert}^ in a sup- 
ply, is an sesthetic objection in the case of 
domestic supplies, and a more serious, one in 
the case of supplies fof certain industrial pur^ 
poses. • - 


Friday, Feb. 14. — Regular meeting of the Technique 
Board at 4.15 P.M., 83 Newbury Street. Mass meeting on 
Track Athletics, in Huntington Hall at 1.15 p.m. 

Saturday, Feb. ij. — Meeting of the Glass of 1905, at 
11.30, A.M., Room 1 1, Rogers Bldg; 

Wednesday, Feb. ip. — Musical Clubs Concert at Med- 
field. - 

Plays-, in Town. ', - -r 

While “ Dodo'" and " Tofu Moore’'’' were 
walking along “ Quality Street" in “ Colorado" 
“ Morocco Bound, ” “ The Stowaway B remarked to 
Florodora " that through “ The Power of the Press ” 
he was able to recover “ The Great White Diatnond." 


A Sophomore went to the “ Cage ” one day, 
Expecting a seat for a matinee ; 

But, oh ! just think of Kis awful lot, 

An F in history’s all that he, got I. 



The Lounger has returned. Technology, conse- 
quently, has recommenced. Only a few weeks, now, 
of super-saturated industry, and the -school year will 
be over, every one will be permitted to retire to his 
favorite hospital, and will in due time thereafter re- 
ceive from the- secretary the annual list of choice 
selections from Freehand Charlie’s Letter Plates. 
Unfortunately, the choice selections will prove but 
Hobson’s Choice, — literally and figuratively, — abd 
each recipient will-recognize in the parchment before 
him an implied invitation to return next year and do 
it all over again. From latest bulletins from the 
office" of the secretary, The Lounger has gathered 
the material presented in the following table, showing 
the results accomplished by the powers that be, in 
the< recent examinations. 

'PER CENT 'flunked '.IN SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMS. 

Gain over 



1903 

1901 

1991 

Freshman Chemistry 

40 

38 

2 

§ophompie Physics 

48 

47 

I 

Junior Political Economy 

42 

50 

^8 

Senior Applied - 

57 

47. : 

10 

By this it is apparent that 

the good work 

of the 

Institute is not on the wane, 

so far, 

at least. 

as the 


instructors are concerned. The abnormal reversal of 
percentages in Pol. Econ. is explainable only by (a) 
clerical error in the secretary’s office, or (b) over- 
sight on the part of the instructor marking the papers. 
Assurance has been made, however, that it will not 
! happen again. The showing of A/flied is highly 
j gratifying and will doubtless prove an index to an en- 
forced economy on the part of the Institute in regard 
; to diplomas later in the year. 

But, after all, this is ancient history.. The second 
term has commenced. This The Lounger knows to 
I- be a fact ; he was told so by the bursar, who made a 
! special visit to the president’s office to make sure. 
Again the hordes of — not barbarians now, but half- 
civilized, fill the forum of Rogers, even as the corri- 
dors of a city, hall are flooded in a democratic 
administration. The Y. M. C. A. contingent is con- 
spicuously absent — for this is the second term, and 
the" former neophytes have learned the way to chapel. 





The great labor-saving device of the secretary — the 
so-called Roll Slips, resembUng a class ballot on 
the one side and a railroad ten-trip ticket on the 
other — “meets with universal approval, it is probably 
one of the most subtle economics of labor ever in- 
augurated by Technology, this intellectual pedigree 
blank so recently promulgated by the Secretariat. It 
saves the work of fully two clerks in the office, — and 
furnishes employment to fourteen hundred individuals 
instead. The Lounger has done some pretty good 
things in his day, but he’s always ready to elevate his 
chapeau to the secretary I 

♦ ^ ♦ 

The Lounger prepares to compose himself for his 
perennial dream of the coming victorious second 
terra. In accordance with time-honored custom he 
is about to see his long-sought diploma hanging by 
the traditional thread before him — - the nebulous 
background, customary in somnolent experiences' of 
this sort, giving to the pendent diploma the effect of 
the angelic ascent to heaven of little Eva in Act V, 
Scene 4, of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.’’ The Lounger 
is to see this alluring diploma — tantalizing as it was 
fifteen years ago, when he wrote his first second-term 
dream — come ever nearer and clearer to him, and 
then suddenly vanish into thin air, in the manner 
rendered sacred by years of literary repetition, at the 
automatic cough of the business manager, .who is 
annually bribed to enter The Tech office at just the 
right wrong-time and shatter the immortal vision of 
the yearly dreamer. But the pitcher that goes too 
often to the well meets the fate of all teetotallers, 
and this year The Lounger’s dream cannot eventuate. 
The business manager has a grauch and won’t come in 
and- cough. . The dream can’t be interrupted, The 
Lounger will actually graduate, and — but enough — • 


to ensure perpetuity to this column, the dream shall 
not be dreamed. The reveries of Christmas and 
Thanksgiving time — psychological events . which 
come year after year as regularly as insurance com- 
panys’ calendars — must suffice for this volume of 
The Tech.' ' The Lounger mast postpone somno- 
lence, and its concomitants, until 1.30 a.m., and medi- 
tate now, in ink, on things real. 

^ ¥ 

The Lounger is not a happy vacationist. He 
cannot appreciate or enjoy the happiness that those 
unthinking mortals seem to get out of their midyear 
recess. How vain they are; little they seem to 
think of the terrible first day and the making out of 
the tabular views 1 “ Wild Animals I Have Known ” 

is placed way back in the family circle as compared 
with the frenzied and haggarded mien of the victim 
as he seizes the schedules for a dozen years behind 
and a dozen years in advance, and with feverish haste 
vainly endeavors to get that second year Dutch with 
the easy man. He tries to calculate it out by that 
infallible system with which he once broke the bank ; 
but it is no use, the schedules are beyond all physical 
and mental solution, — > they are the work of the secre- 
tary. However, this is but a taste of the red tape. 
Every year the system is being added to for the in- 
struction of the students. The roll-slips furnish a 
happy means of enabling one to learn after awhile 
how to write his name. The Lounger suggests that 
the attendance cards may be greatly enhanced in 
value by placing on the backs, besides the date of 
birth and other equally interesting subjects, such 
questions as: What size underclothes do you wear? 
and are your feet rights and lefts? etc., etc. With 
this happy suggestion^ The Lounger bids his de- 
lighted audience adieu. 





!r 



iiA ml irr iurfilil iiiin mnmi iii 



Keep Mfg. Company 

Makers of Kcep^s Shirts 

ARE SHOWING THE LATEST 
IDEAS IN BEAUTIFUL 
DESIGNS OF ^ ^ ^ 



Scotch Madras 

For 

Custom Shirts 


at much less than is usual with ordinary shirt 
makers* for similar quality. 

We would be glad to send you our latest 
price list fully describing our immense stock 
of young men’s furnishings. May we do so? 
“ Buy from the makers and save 25%.” 


T. E. Moseley & Co. 



COLLEGE MEN 
will find bur lines of 
“RADICAL” and 
“E XTRE M E” 
College Styles v’ery 
complete 


Prices $3.50 to $8.50 

145 TREMONT 5T., 


nottindiiani 

X Ox ®"'» 

\ ! Sqtiare. 

i > 

1' Three minutes walk from the 
New Back Bay Stations of the 
Boston & Albany and N. Y., 

N. H. & H. 

Patronage of Tech Students is solicited 
in our Cafe. 

€urotiean Plan. 

♦ 

£Nctt Baggage Back Bay Station* Boston, 
a. M. Mbtpplc. 


Odd Lot Sale ^ 

^ to ^ Usual Price 

Fancy Shirts, $1.00 

Formerly $1.50, $2.00 and $2,50. 

Derby and Soft Hats, 
$2.00 and $2.50 

Formerly $3.00, $4.00 and $4.50. 

Above discount applies to nearly everything. 

THE SAWYER CO., 

134 Boylston Street* Near Colonial Theatre. 
Hatters, Glovers and Shirtmakers. 


In writing advertleer* kindly meuuou 'iBii Ti:.CH. 






The BRUNSWICK The Bostonette Rata Coat 


BOSTON, Boylston and Clarendon Sts 


(Adjoining Copley Square) 



Kept on Both American and European Plans. 
BARNES & DUNKLEE Proprietors. 

H. 11. BARNES, Hanager* 



Guaranteed absolutely water- 
proof. in all the handsome 
colorings. No young man’s 
wardrobe complete without a 

“Bostonette” 

PRICES: 

$10. $15. $20. 

* * 

RAIN C0AT“ ’ SOLD ONLY BY 

Standard Clothing Co., 

395 Washington Street. 

Just below 'Winter St. 

THe Official Tech Pin. 


Gold Plated on Silver, ${.00. 

Gold, $2.60. Silver 75 cents. 

HENRY GlILO & SON, 

’ o’.her Society Pins - 

28 WEST STREET, formerly at 
433 Washington St., cor. Winter St., BOSTON. 



A. S. ADAHS 

Maker of the Oificial 

^10. 11. tr. nMn 

8 Winter St., BOSTON 



LANDERS’ 

NEW LUNCH AND COFFEE HOUSE 

20 ; HUNTINGTON AVE. 

NEAR COPLEY SQUARE. BOSTON 


TRY OUR NEW MENU, TWENTY-FIVE YEARS* EXPERIENCE 


In writing advertisers kindly mention THB TECH. 



THE TEOH 


ix 


Colonial Theatre. — “Floradora” by the star 
New York company. Well worth seeing. Engage- 
ment limited. 

Tremont Theatre. — “King Dodo,” one of the 
best comic operas of late, is the attraction at this 
house. The cast is an excellent one, and includes a 
chorus of seventy unsurpassing singers. 

Boston Museum. — Andrew Mack in “ Tom 
Moore ” closes his successful engagement this week. 
Next week May Irwin in a new production of “Widow 
Jones ” is the attraction. Boston theatregoers will 
have another chance to see this clever comedienne 
in a most interesting farce. 

Columbia Theatre. — Closed until further notice. 

Castle Square Theatre. — “The Power of the 
Press,” a remarkable melodrama, has proven to be 
very popular, and is having a successful week. The 
next attraction will be “ The Nominee ” by the regu- 
lar company. 


ncpniri/ tickets copiey 

UCIXIVIVIV all theatres Square, 
Telephone 608 and 950 Back Bay. 


Private l..essons a SpeciaXts^. 

MISS POST, Dancing and Deportment, 

Pierce Hall, Copley Square. 

A New Class for Beginners, commencing Thursday, January 23 
' TERMS : $12 for 10 Lessons. 

PRIVATE LESSONS and CLASSES. Office Hours, 9 to ii a.ra. 


IMPORTANT. 

An Immense Reduction Sale 

B ginning January 20 and cnnlimiimr through February we shall MARK 
DOWN all of iiur WINTER DOUBLE SOLE GOODS, together with numerous 
broken and odd lines of Stylish Modern Shape Shoes in Single Soles. This 
will not be a shop-worn sale of obsolete and undesirable goods, but a gener.al and 
sweeping reduction of FINE SEASONABLE GOODS, l^iices will be marked 
way down to insure a complete cleaning out to make room for Spring Goods. 

COES & STODDER, 

DOWN-TOWN STORE UP-TOWN STORE ^ 

t4 School St. 78 Boyiston St» 

In writifig adverti:*erss kiudly meutiow' TWOH. 



THE GIRLS ARS POND OP *I HESC ' 


TECH EMBLEMS. 


Greatest Variety. 
Lowest Prices. 

BENT & BUSH, 


387 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



Week Commencing Feb. 1 7, 1 902. 

Hollis Street Theatre. — Last week of Maude 
Adrtms. Next attraction, Miss Ellen Terry and Henry 
Irving in “ King Charles I,” on Monday ; “ Merchant 
of Venice,” Tuesday and Friday; “Madame Sans 
Gene,” Wednesday and Thursday evenings and Sat- 
urday matinee : “ Louis XI ” on Saturday evening. 





i 


at 



The long- Bonght goal, “Kase and Comfort 
in Suspenders,” is triumphantly reached in 


“Salon” lyonotg awar^e^ 6 b 
gbe pbotogcapt?ec 0 Bosocfatfon 
of Hew gnfliand, at tbelr 
Conventions, 1000 ^1001 


PRESIDENT 

SUSPENDERS 


Photographer to n. I. T. 

Classes of 1901 and 1902 

...is-.- 


Ho we ver hard the foot halt player ” Mcis,’' 
it will not be against the “President.’' It 
adjusts itself to every bend and 
twist of the body, imparting com- 
'V fort and ease. Every pair guar- 
. outccd. bee that “rre>ident” 

. is on the buckles. 
-Trimmings con not 
rust. College men Will 
find them at stores. 50 
cents, or 
by mail, 
^postpaid. 

State 
whether 
“}'ou wantlight 
or dark, wide or 
narrow. 

C. A. EDGARTON 
MFG. CO. 
282, Shirley, Mass. 



Charles W. Hearn, 

394 BOYLSTON ST., near Hotel Berkeley, Boston. 


By nature of the contract -with Senior Class, all 
Uudents as -well as friends and relatives receive especially 
favorable rates. Students will kindly obtain tickets at 
studio for pictures desired by their friends. 

Ask to see our “ Artist’s Proofs.” Very Nobby and 
New Photograph. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Elevator to 5tudio 


t|h e h a n d y shop 

Ho|tEL WESTMINSTER * COPLEY SQUARE 
. MRS. E. S. GARDNER^ 

Agett for Noj»es Bros*’ I,yaundry* Getitlemen*s nienditg a specialty 
‘Geutlemen's Manicuring and Chiropody, 

\ -Reduced rates to Students, 

i 

MISS A. F. CANFIEED. MME. FIELD. 


HE WINS & HOLLIS, 

4 HAMILTON PLACE, - BOSTON. 

MEN'S 

FURNISHING 

GOO^S 


Ask v0wr bookseller to shcv.'y0t* thessbocks, 
Rui^iished by H inds &* Aoble^ New York* 

Songs of All the CollpKea - * - 

Songe of tUo Eastern Colleires - - l.w 

Songs of tbo 'Western Colleges • - i,So 

New Son« for Glee Olube •, ♦ - ,50 

3 Minute Declamations for College Men 1,00 

3 Minute Readings for College Gills - 1,00 

New Pieces for Prize Speaking - • 1.25 

Pros and Cons (Complete Debate^ • 1-SO 

CommencsEuent l'arte,( Orations, Eesa^, etc*) LOO 



I 

I 

5 

a 

I 

E 

I 

E 

S 

If 

I 

E 

K 


I 


■ 

m 

I 


i 




In writing advertlaers kindly mention THE TECH. 










Editorial tStaff 

^ THE TECH oi 




A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE 
DEVOTED TO THE 
INTERESTS OF THE 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE 
OF TECHNOLOGY 


AND 


^J^gCpLISHED OF CLASS SECRETARIES 

, , develop closer relations among Institute men, and to stimulate their interest in the 

/ V' work- 

It isliittlhp^a^iae’ an'engih but deals broadly with the problems of Technological Educa- 

, ^itipn hnd .jt^'res^^biU 

Dollar a Year Single Copies, Thirty^ive Cents ^ 

'finely bound in half morocco, are ready for delivery at $2.50 each, or will be ex- 
sets, provided they aiB in good condition^ at ^1.30 each. 




la Advortfaers lUnatr meutloa THB TBCH. 




\ ' 





(jPonuaHy^ H; H. . Tattle Co.y 


Tailor ancl 


^ l can offer TOtt a laTgeriuid more coitiptett Uedr^eat 
then can be aeea eUc^bere, and at lower prk;es‘|for ^ 
tamt duaiMes'.^ I.ook In and examine mf pHee* before 

" ' ' Golff breeches, Riding l^rei^ch'e$, and Dr^an 

238 Washington Street, BOSTON. ? Suita # Spcciidty, " . 

OP«>. yoUN<l»& HOTEL. ^ ’ DISCOOIIIC TO STUDBITW. 

Write for a CatatosHe. , ■> * t . ' 

W£ CARRY A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OP THE CELEBRATED 

Hart, Schaffner & M arr: 


TOR THH ST0DBNT AND CORRSCTLY DR^KD VoUNG MAK.” : “ t ? "~s f ' S : 

CONTINENTAL CLOTHIND HOOSE, 





^} 35 l 


^^9 »1 



iJy 


Oi, 





tteom 


111 


oyal Tjairy T unch 



n and 12 PARK SQUARE 
BOSTON ^ MASS, 

Open Day and Night 


A. C. STONE, ) 

>■ Proprictofs 
C. H. MANSFIELD, j 



*««[,Kmgocu., 

700 Washington Street, BOSTON. 

CUSTOM DEPARTMENT 

Is now prepared to show the 
latest novelties for all garments. 


Overcoats to order, 
Suits to order, - 
Trousers to order, 


$20 to $55 
$20 to $40 
$6 to $12 


Fit and Wear Guaranteed. 




MATTHEW KING, Manager, 


The Berkeley Hotel 

B«*>K«>l.e9r and Bos'lston Streets 

9 9 

EUROPEAN AND ^ V* 

4T ^ AMX^RICAN PLANS 

Motlerxi in Rvery Detail 
9 9 

H^es tatur a.nt a 1& Carte 
Dininff room table d* bote 

Gentlemen’s CA.r£ and Billiard 
Room. Entrance on BeirKeley St. 

9 9 

JOHN A. SHERLOCK 


C F. HOVEY & CO., 


Importers and Retailers of 


Dry Goods, 


HNE CUSTOM MADE 
SHIRTS A SPECIALTY. 


PARIS, 

12 Ambroise 
T homas. 


BOSTON, 

S3 Summer St. 

AND 

42 At>on St. 


In writing advertisers kindly mention TH!E/ TKOH. 


iv 




Pocket niagiiifviitg glasses 



two £(n$($. Diam. ?>$ and i itieb. 

Price 40c. each. 

We are prepared to quote lowest 
prices on all forms of Magnifying 
Glasses, Coddingtons, Aplanatic 
Triplets, etc. Cameras and Photo- 
graphic Supplies. 

Pinkham fir iSmith 

Opticians, 


Everything 

SUITABLE FOR YOUNG MEN 


Smoking Jackets, Gloves, Umbrellas, 

Ties, Furnishing Goods of all kinds. 

Special Line of Dress Suit Cases 

$ 2.50 $ 4.00 $ 5.00 $ 6.00 $ 7.00 

We take orders in our Military Dept, 
for College and Society Bmblenis, made 
■ with either screw back, button or pin 
fastening, hard- enameled, in correct 
colors for the society which the emblem 
represents. 


OAK HALL 

Washington and Elm Streets. 


Boston, Hass. 


SCIENTIFIC BOOKS 

DArtRELL & UPHAn, 


Poll In! 


The Old Corner Bookstore 

283 Washington St., Boston. 


Keep Step with Progress 
in the Art Of Photography 


ALL GOODS REQUIRED BY 
STUDENTS AT 

flftaclacblan's, 

214 Clafenbon Street. 

Drawing Instruments and Materials, etc. 
Fountain Pens, Text Books. 


All the Latest Hiah Art 
Productions con be had of 



2 1 West St. - - Boston, Mass. 



la writinit adyertisers kindly mention THE TECH, 






V 


M 


STEEL CO., 


Locomotive and Caf Wheel Tires, 
Forgings and Castings, 

Bar Steel. 


Nickel Steel 
Forgings 


Ordnance 

Forgings 


Marine Engines. 


Castings. 


- OFHCE AND WORKS; 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


In writing advertisers kindly mention THE TECH 





VI 


tme: 


Hall & Hancock 


Novelties in - - - - 

PAMONA GLOVE 

SOFT HATS 

AND 

$ 1.50 

VERY desirable 

STIFF HATS 

RAY 

CANES, ^ UMBRELLAS 

SOP Washington St., cor. 
West St. 

HAT CASES AND GLOVES 

BOSTON 

407 Washington Street 


DISCOUNT TO TECH STUDENTS 




THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF FOREIGN WOOLLENS SHOWN IN BOSTON. 

CO-OPERATIVE. 


In writiiiK advertisers Idndly mention THB TECH.